Can You Use a Vibrating Back Massager During Pregnancy?

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By Dr. Lisa Smiley | Updated on Dec 8, 2023
Image for article Can You Use a Vibrating Back Massager During Pregnancy?

It’s best to get approval from your healthcare provider before using a vibrating back massager during pregnancy. 

Back pain is one of the most common complaints during pregnancy, with the majority of studies reporting approximately 50% of pregnant people experience it 1 . A vibrating back massager might be a good way to relieve discomfort, reduce stress, and improve circulation during pregnancy. 

Vibration has been found to be effective in reducing pain 2 and increasing strength and flexibility.

While there’s no evidence regarding any harmful effects of localized vibration during pregnancy, precautions for prenatal massage include high-risk pregnancy, preeclampsia, preterm labor, recent bleeding, preterm contractions, or severe swelling or headaches 3 , so be sure to talk to your doctor before using a back massager. 

Keep in mind that a physical therapist or chiropractor can help you relieve back through a variety of interventions.

Be aware that back pain, especially if wrapping around the abdomen, can be a sign of preterm labor. Call your healthcare provider prior to using a vibrating back massager to discuss newer onset back pain.

Pregnant woman holding her stomach on a bed with a plant in the background

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Expectful uses only high-quality sources, including academic research institutions, medical associations, and subject matter experts.

  1. Ranjeeta Shijagurumayum Acharya, Anne Therese Tveter, Margreth Grotle, Malin Eberhard-Gran and Britt Stuge"Prevalence and severity of low back- and pelvic girdle pain in pregnant Nepalese women"BMC Pregnancy and ChildbirthJul 15, 2019https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6631866/.

  2. Xingang Lu, Yiru Wang, Jun Lu, Yanli You, Lingling Zhang, Danyang Zhu, and Fei Yao"Does vibration benefit delayed-onset muscle soreness?: a meta-analysis and systematic review"Sage Journals, vol. 47, no. 1Jan 1, 2019https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6384495/.

  3. "Prenatal Massage Therapy"https://americanpregnancy.org/healthy-pregnancy/is-it-safe/prenatal-massage/.


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Updated on Dec 8, 2023

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Can You Use a Vibrating Back Massager During Pregnancy?

 Lisa Smiley Profile Photo
By Dr. Lisa Smiley | Updated on Dec 8, 2023
Image for article Can You Use a Vibrating Back Massager During Pregnancy?

It’s best to get approval from your healthcare provider before using a vibrating back massager during pregnancy. 

Back pain is one of the most common complaints during pregnancy, with the majority of studies reporting approximately 50% of pregnant people experience it 1 . A vibrating back massager might be a good way to relieve discomfort, reduce stress, and improve circulation during pregnancy. 

Vibration has been found to be effective in reducing pain 2 and increasing strength and flexibility.

While there’s no evidence regarding any harmful effects of localized vibration during pregnancy, precautions for prenatal massage include high-risk pregnancy, preeclampsia, preterm labor, recent bleeding, preterm contractions, or severe swelling or headaches 3 , so be sure to talk to your doctor before using a back massager. 

Keep in mind that a physical therapist or chiropractor can help you relieve back through a variety of interventions.

Be aware that back pain, especially if wrapping around the abdomen, can be a sign of preterm labor. Call your healthcare provider prior to using a vibrating back massager to discuss newer onset back pain.

Pregnant woman holding her stomach on a bed with a plant in the background

Want evidence-based health & wellness advice for fertility, pregnancy, and postpartum delivered to your inbox?

Your privacy is important to us. By subscribing you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms & Conditions.

Expectful uses only high-quality sources, including academic research institutions, medical associations, and subject matter experts.

  1. Ranjeeta Shijagurumayum Acharya, Anne Therese Tveter, Margreth Grotle, Malin Eberhard-Gran and Britt Stuge"Prevalence and severity of low back- and pelvic girdle pain in pregnant Nepalese women"BMC Pregnancy and ChildbirthJul 15, 2019https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6631866/.

  2. Xingang Lu, Yiru Wang, Jun Lu, Yanli You, Lingling Zhang, Danyang Zhu, and Fei Yao"Does vibration benefit delayed-onset muscle soreness?: a meta-analysis and systematic review"Sage Journals, vol. 47, no. 1Jan 1, 2019https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6384495/.

  3. "Prenatal Massage Therapy"https://americanpregnancy.org/healthy-pregnancy/is-it-safe/prenatal-massage/.


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