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Lactation Consultant

Are you hoping to breastfeed your baby? A lactation consultant can be a key component in ensuring this goal to happen and to help sustain it. While breastfeeding seems to “click” for some mothers, it involves a steep learning curve for most—after all, your baby is learning how to feed for the first time, too!


Book an Appointment Virtual, from anywhere.

Even if it’s not your first child, each breastfeeding experience is different. It may have come easily with your first, but your second is more challenging (or vice versa).

Some mothers may choose not to breastfeed for a variety of reasons, and if that’s you, we wholly support you and your decision! We know choosing how to feed your baby is not always so simple and is entirely a personal decision. Please know that a lactation consultant can assist with this transition as well. Regardless of how your baby’s being fed, what’s important is your physical and emotional health and that your baby is well-fed. A healthy and supported mother = a healthy baby.

Book an appointment with a lactation consultant right now

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Did You Know?


While not all mothers choose to nurse, studies show that those who prefer to are often unable to or discontinue earlier than desired due to lack of education and support. But they’ve found that a certified lactation consultant can positively alter the trajectory of a nursing mother’s breastfeeding journey.

Did You Know?


92% of new moms struggle to breastfeed in the first few days postpartum. A lactation consultant can help you overcome these challenges.

How a Lactation Consultant Can Support You


We’re big fans of getting in touch with a lactation consultant prior to delivering your baby.

For some, this means having a brief consultation with someone to see if they are a good fit for you in the event you hit any feeding bumps after baby comes. It can be challenging to do the research at the time that you’re actually in need of a lactation consultant’s expertise!

For others, a prenatal lactation consultation can help troubleshoot known issues that may make breastfeeding more challenging. For example, the following can sometimes affect milk production or latch:

  • Flat or inverted nipples
  • Previous breast surgeries (including implants)
  • Trouble nursing before
  • Gestational diabetes diagnosis
  • Hormonal conditions
  • Autoimmune diseases

To get ahead of any of these or other challenges, we recommend contacting a lactation consultant beforehand.

Many hospitals employ lactation counselors or consultants on the maternity floor. If so, following the birth of your baby, a lactation consultant or counselor will visit and see how breastfeeding is going. She’ll watch you breastfeed and suggest various positions and latching techniques. You can also consult one you connected with prenatally during this time.

Once you’ve returned home and as your milk starts to come in on day 3 post-birth, you may find that you’re still struggling with breastfeeding. Perhaps you never felt like you caught on in the hospital or your baby is latching differently than he or she was at birth. This is all totally normal! You’ll want to enlist the knowledge of a lactation consultant; they’ll be able to address any concerns or issues you’re having. Common problems are:

  • Sore or cracked nipples
  • Low milk supply
  • Difficulties latching or staying latched
  • Breast engorgement
  • Clogged ducts
  • Breast infection, such as mastitis

Meet One of Our Experts

expectful Hi, I’m Carrie.

I’m an international board-certified lactation consultant.

I love empowering families with knowledge, confidence and choices on how to move forward with their infant feeding relationship. It is a privilege to be a part of the tribe that is essential to new families during the major transition into parenthood.

Support I offer: Lactation,  Pumping,  Weaning.


FAQs

To be a professional lactation consultant, you must be certified by the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE) through the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA). This entails 90 hours of lactation coursework, 1,000 hours of supervised clinical hours with moms and babies, an exam, and keeping up with continuing education requirements. Our lactation consultants are all International Board of Lactation Consultants® (IBCLC), which is the highest degree of certification to ensure that you’re getting the most comprehensive care. Many also have degrees in very unique feeding challenges such as…

 

You may interact with a lactation counselor at the hospital during your stay. They too are trained in breastfeeding support, but they have less coursework, fewer hours of training, and have not sat for the extensive exams that IBCLCs have gone through.

We recommend contacting a lactation consultant as soon as you experience any difficulties. You can meet with one at any point in your breastfeeding journey, as frequently as you need. Some women meet with a lactation consultant just once while others need a few visits. Remember, you are learning to breastfeed and baby is learning to eat so it can take a few visits for both to figure out the relationship.

 

We also recommend that a few types of mothers contact one even before problems arise, shortly after birth. These include those who had:

  • pre-eclampsia
  • a c-section
  • a preemie who may have gone to the NICU

It varies. Some women meet with a lactation consultant just once while others need a few follow-up visits.  It’s also common to see a lactation consultant, even if breastfeeding is going well, when you go through a transition such as pumping, weaning or introducing solid food.

Absolutely! A lactation consultant is trained to help you with those decisions. She will talk through your options with you, whether it’s stopping breastfeeding, supplementing with formula, exclusively pumping, or a blend of all three. Together you’ll come up with a plan that supports your physical and emotional health as well as your baby’s.

Yes! Lactation consultants can assist with pumping as you transition back to work and weaning. Clogged ducts and mastitis are problems that can emerge at any time on your nursing journey.

There are many benefits of virtual visits – ease, convenience, and cost – making this type of care so much more accessible to every mom. That said, there are differences between a virtual visit and an in-person visit.

 

Luckily, with good lighting, a strong internet connection, clear communication, and patience, virtual lactation consultants are very successful in setting mom and baby on a healthy feeding path.

When you book an appointment with a lactation consultant, you’ll complete a questionnaire related to your little one’s current feeding habits and your feeding goals.

 

If you have a newborn consultation, the lactation consultant will want to observe a feeding to check your baby’s latch and swallow. If you can, it’s helpful to keep an additional feeding log of when and how long they feed for and any other notes that would be helpful to give context to your lactation consultant. 

 

For consultations in which a feeding may be observed, good lighting and an extra set of hands to hold your phone, tablet, or computer is always a plus!

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